WRITERS CONNECT! Issue 27

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Welcome to the Writers Connect! Newsletter

Writing is a human experience. It’s about connection with everyone and everything around us.

We understand you’re busy. So the newsletter usually has just four or five main items of content. A brief but satisfying read.

In this issue:

  • Write Here, Right Now: Writing Competitions
  • Word of the Day. An unusual word to keep your writing fresh
  • Humorous Quote
  • Inspiration

Write Here, Right Now: Writing Events

Following are writing competitions that close during August and September 2020.

For competition closing dates, bear in mind these relate to the time zone where the competition originates, so check the relevant site.

 

Comp 1: Fosseway Writers Flash Fiction Competition

An opportunity for flash fiction writers to get their teeth into writing a story of 300 words or fewer.

About: The organisers say that every word should count … ‘distil the very essence of your story into its purest form while at the same time immersing the reader into the scene’

Open to: International. Age limit not stated

Word count: Maximum 300 (but it’s a limit, not a target. If you can achieve it in 219 or 73 words, that’s fine)

Theme: The prompt is ‘Symbiotic’

Closes: 8 August 2020

Entry fee: £5

Prize: 1st = £50, 2nd = £30, 3rd = £20

Details here:

https://fossewaywriters.wordpress.com/competitions/

 

Comp 2: Rebecca Swift Foundation Women Poets’ Prize

This award honours Rebecca Swift’s two key passions: poetry and the empowerment of women.

About: The prize is awarded once every two years to three women poets. Each winner is carefully matched with a poetry mentor and offered pastoral coaching. The prize also offers support and creative professional development opportunities with the foundation’s partners

Open to: International

Word count: Maximum 40 lines

Theme: The organisers’ definition of poetry is broad and dynamic. They’re as interested in the ideas running through the work as they are in the way the work appears visually on the page

Closes: 14 August 2020

Entry fee: Free

Prizes: Each winner receives a cash prize of £1000 in addition to the support detailed above

Details here:

https://www.rebeccaswiftfoundation.org/women-poets-prize/

 

Comp 3: Twist & Twain Short Story Contest 2020-21

Twist & Twain is an online literary magazine, and this is  its second short story contest.

About: Story must be written originally in English

Open to: International 18+ both new and established writers

Length: Up to 4,000 words

Theme: Any theme, setting or genre

Closes: 15 August 2020

Entry fee: $9 (see details for residents of India vs non-residents of India)

Prizes: 1st = Rs. 25,000 (c. $300). 2nd = Rs. 15,000 (c. $180). 3rd = 10,000 (c. $120)

Details here:

https://www.twistandtwain.com/eligibility-and-entry-rules-of-short-story-contest/

 

Comp 4: Book Pipeline: Adaptation

Mentioned previously in Issue 24, it’s worth including this competition again, as there are few competitions available for published works.

About: The competition seeks published books, graphic novels, short stories and plays for film and television adaptation. Judging criteria is weighed evenly between concept originality, marketability in the current landscape and overall writing talent

Open to: International 18+

Word Count: None

Theme: Any genre, any theme

Closes: 5 September 2020

Entry fee: $60

Prizes: Every entrant receives general feedback on their submission, specifically on its adaptation potential. Winner = $10,000 + film/TV industry circulation + project development. Two runners-up = $1,000 each (see website for further prizes)

Details here: https://bookpipeline.com/shop/adaptation-contest

 

Word of the Day

bludge

Well, I thought I knew the meaning of the slang word bludge, but the Macquarie Dictionary Blog of 13 July 2020 has put me right. I’d always used it to mean ‘to live off someone else’. The meaning now is to waste time when you should be doing something else. Originally in Australian slang, to bludge meant to live off the earnings of a prostitute.

There’s also on the bludge, meaning to be idle or doing nothing. I spent yesterday bludging around the coast when I should have been working.

bludge can also mean that something like a job or a class requires hardly any work. This assignment is a bludge.

 

Humorous quote

I am a writer. If I seem cold, it’s because I am surrounded by draftsUnknown

 

Get Inspired

Dance above the surface of the world. Let your thoughts lift you into creativity that is not hampered by opinion― Red Haircrow (an award-winning writer, educator, chef and filmmaker of Native American descent)

Keep well, keep safe, keep writing 🙂

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